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NEWS & PRESS

12.02.2000
CAPE COD TIMES - New Eatery on Hyannis Menu

By Jack Perry, Staff Writer
As seen in The Cape Cod Times
 
 

HYANNIS- The former home of the East End Pub and the Road Kill Cafe was sold for $220,000 yesterday at auction.

R. Newton Heston, owner of four breakfast and lunch restaurants, was the winning bidder, according to Jerome J. Manning, president of Jerome J. Manning and Co., Inc., which conducted the auction.

Heston, an East Sandwich resident, owns Persy's Place restaurants in Mashpee, Kingston, Middleboro, and North Dartmouth.

Heston said he hopes to have his new restaurant open in March. It will have 140 seats, including a deck on the second story. Like Heston's other restaurants, Persy's Place in Hyannis will serve only breakfast and lunch.

"We're a nice family restaurant and we'll be trying to generate a family environment there, a nice, warm, homey New England feeling," Heston said.

The two-story restaurant at 247 Main St. has been vacant for about 18 months since the Road Kill Cafe closed, Manning said. The property includes a one-bedroom condominium. The seller is Henry DiPrete of Sandwich.

The auction drew 15 bidders. Manning said interest increased because of plans for a transportation terminal on 11 acres across from the restaurant. The transportation center would serve as a combination bus terminal, train depot and transfer station to island ferries and the airport. Construction could begin early next year and be completed in a year.

"It's certainly going to bring foot traffic to the East End," Manning said.Heston was attracted to the property partly because of the new transportation center. he said, "Downtown Hyannis is kind of a unique downtown. It has a lot to offer, and I think it's starting to come back.The property was sold at an "absolute" auction, meaning there was no minimum set on the bidding."It's the free-market system. You have to have faith in the marketplace," Manning said.